Vertigo and Sensory Disorder

I’m writing this post from my iPad. I can’t use the desktop for long because I get car sick. Car sick?! Well, it feels like motion sickness, even when I’m doing no more than looking at the computer monitors. Because of the work I do, I have two monitors, but I suspect that this would be difficult just one one. The iPad, however, seems to be okay.

Why would the iPad and my Droid phone be okay even though I can’t use the computer? My guess is that because the screens are small, my eyes don’t have to move around so much. Even then, I can’t play certain games with a lot of movement (Bejeweled Blitz, for one). At least I can watch Blackhawks hockey tonight!

So, what does this have to do with spectrum issues? Vertigo can be debilitating for anyone. My, you’re full of questions today! Well, the answer is that I am experiencing this, it’s my

blog, and I feel like it.

It comes down to tolerance of an unusual situation. I cannot imagine how The Munchie would deal with this. She’d probably scream, cry, and throw up. A lot. For me, I’m only dealing this “well” because I have support in the form of the part time nanny who is dealing with the kids, and the same with Xife (the husband).

It’s extremely frustrating to be sidelined. I can’t even drive right now. I drove yesterday to pick up some Antivert from Walgreens. It’s not that far, but I already felt ill by the time I got there.

Well, I’m going to read to the Munchie. She has a cold and stayed home from school today. Hopefully that will not be a problem!

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Subtitle Change

It occurred to me that it might be presumptuous to have a subtitle of “Being a Woman with Aspergers…” when I haven’t been officially diagnosed. There is a more than middling–but less than certain–chance that I DO have Asperger’s Syndrome. What it comes down to is that I am not normal. Never have been, and never will be. I definitely do have Sensory Processing Disorder (which explains how I can have near perfect hearing yet have difficulty understanding what people say!), and I most definitely have a different perspective than the average human.

We’re early in the process of getting The Munchie thoroughly evaluated for where she falls on the spectrum. With her, there is little-to-no doubt. As a mom, this saddens me beyond belief. It’s not because she’s different, but that her differences make it hard for her to interact with people. She is a treasure to all who know her. Yes, I’m biased, but you should see all the staff and students with broken hearts at her school of the past three years, now that she’s moving on to a different school. (That is a story for another post.) She’s the sweet kid everyone falls in love with in spite of themselves. This is a gift I am grateful she has.

I’ll post more later. I had some ideas for useful information I can share through the blog. Really, it’s about more than me and my experience; it’s about embracing differences both within myself and with others, and providing information to help other “weird” people to be “happily eccentric”!